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Resources

Here are helpful FAQ's and more information

on speech-language pathology resources. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions on Insurance and Pricing

Do you take insurance? 

  • At this time, Eat Speak Breathe does not take insurance. We devote as much time as possible to patient care. We do not to contract with any insurance providers, so that we can devote valuable time to patients and minimize time spent on the administration of insurance claims and interaction with insurance companies. Although we do not contract with any insurance providers, we can provide you with an insurance reimbursement claim form (also called a “superbill”) upon your request. We cannot guarantee that you will be reimbursed by your health insurance carrier for payment of services rendered.

How much is a treatment session? 

  • Please contact us for pricing and payment.

How much is an evaluation?

  • Please contact us for pricing and payment.

Questions on Treatment and Evaluations 

How long is a treatment session? 

  • A treatment session is a hour - 50 minutes of direct treatment and 10 minutes of discussion/coaching with parent and/or caregiver (grandparent, babysitter, nanny).

How long is an evaluation? 

  • Evaluations range from an hour (60 min.) to an hour and an a half (90 min.). Also, It depends on the age of the child, type of testing, and the amount of testing. For example, an evaluation for a toddler is shorter compared to an evaluation for a school aged child. If a child needs more than one test; then, the evaluation takes longer. 

Does my child need an evaluation?

  • As a new client to Eat Speak Breathe, we want to understand your child's speech-language strengths and weaknesses.

  • If your child has not been evaluated (tested) within the last 6 months, Your child will need an evaluation.

  • If your child has been evaluated (tested) within the past 6 months, then you do not need an evaluation.

  • However- this is dependent on the type/area of speech-language assessment. For example, if a child may have had language testing within the last 6 months; however, he/she/they are showing signs of stuttering, They will need a new evaluation - a fluency / stuttering evaluation.

How often are treatment sessions? 

  • This depends on your child's needs, the type of disorder, the severity of the disorder, and the desired rate of progress. 

  • If a child has a moderate to severe disorder/delay we recommend for 2 or more sessions weekly. 

  • If your child has an articulation disorder or stuttering disorder, you may want an intensive amount of therapy during the summer. Then, a higher frequency or rate of sessions during a brief period of time may be beneficial for you.

Where do you do therapy? 

  • We come to you! Melissa believes in conducting therapy in a child's natural environment, in your home, or in the park, or in a community setting. Please see our contact us page for additional details.

Happy Children

What are speech-language disorders?

Speech-language Disorders/Delays: 

 What is a disorder? :

  • A disorder means that a child is not developing as one would expect, or abnormally.

 What is a delay? :

  •  A delay means that a child is developing in a typical manner, but is doing so more slowly than other children his or her age. 

 Speech Delay:

  • A delay means that a child is developing speech (saying speech sounds of the child's native language) in a typical manner, but is doing so more slowly than other children his or her age. The key factor is the slower progression of speech acquisition in comparison their same age peers. 

 Speech Disorder:

  • As defined by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), 

"... Speech sound disorders is an umbrella term referring to any difficulty or combination of difficulties with perception, motor production, or phonological representation of speech sounds and speech segments—including phonotactic rules governing permissible speech sound sequences in a language.

 Language Delay:

  • A delay means that a child is developing language (saying words, understanding words) in a typical manner, but is doing so more slowly than other children his or her age. The key factor is the slower progression of language acquisition in comparison their same age peers. 

 Language Disorder:

  • As defined by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), 

"...Language Disorder also known as an spoken language disorder, represents a significant impairment in the acquisition and use of language across modalities due to deficits in comprehension and/or production across any of the five language domains (i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics).

 Articulation Disorder:

  • As defined by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), 

"... Articulation disorders are the significant presence of errors (e.g., distortions and substitutions) in the production of individual speech sounds. A child can have difficulty saying the 'r' sound or the 'l' sound in a word, sentence, or conversation. This is an example of an articulation disorder. 

 Phonological Disorder:

  • As defined by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), 

"... A phonological disorder occurs when a child makes predictable and typical patterns of speech sound errors. The mistakes may be common in young children learning speech skills, but when they continue past a certain age, it may be a disorder. A child can produce the /t/ sound for the /k/ sound and say 'tootie' for 'cookie,' this is the phonological process of fronting. 

 Motor Speech Disorder:

  • As defined by Midwestern University Clinics,

"... Motor speech disorders occur when there is a disconnect between the brain and the speech muscles or mechanisms. The connection between the brain and the speech mechanism is broken, damaged or interrupted. Motor Speech Disorders, include two primary conditions: dysarthria and apraxia of speech. This makes it difficult to control and/or coordinate the muscles of the face, tongue, or larynx for the purposes of speaking."

 Fluency Disorder / Stuttering:

  • As defined by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA),

"... A fluency disorder is an interruption in the flow of speaking characterized by atypical rate, rhythm, and repetitions in sounds, syllables, words, and phrases. This may be accompanied by excessive tension, struggle behavior, and secondary mannerisms. Stuttering and Cluttering are types of fluency disorders."

 Social Communication Disorder:

  • As defined by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA),

"....Social communication disorder (SCD) is characterized by persistent difficulties with the use of verbal and nonverbal language for social purposes. Primary difficulties may be in social interaction, social understanding, pragmatics, language processing, or any combination of the above (Adams, 2005). Social communication behaviors such as eye contact, facial expressions, and body language are influenced by sociocultural and individual factors (Curenton & Justice, 2004; Inglebret et al., 2008)."